About

I was born in New Zealand, grew up in Australia, live in Denmark and now work in Sweden.

The path to my PhD studies has been an unusual one. After working in government in Australia, I sought a change of direction in my life. I moved to Denmark in 2018 and started my master’s studies as a kind of career break. I re-discovered an intellectual curiosity that had been left untapped, and developed a passion for macroeconomics and economic history. When I graduated two years later, I realised that there was more I still wanted to explore. That I wasn’t finished studying.

In August 2020, I started as a PhD student in the Department of Economic History at Lund University, Sweden. The programme runs for at least four years, with a mix of coursework and research.

Education

2018-2020Master of Science in Economics (cand.oecon)
University of Southern Denmark (Odense, Denmark)
Specialisation: Macroeconomics and development
2003-2008Bachelor of Arts / Bachelor of Commerce (Hons)
Monash University (Melbourne, Australia)
Specialisations: Economics and political science
First class honours in economics

Professional experience (academia)

During my master’s studies, I worked as a student research assistant in the econometrics and economic history group at the University of Southern Denmark.

I am passionate about education, and enjoy the chance to teach students. I have previously served as an instructor/tutor in various bachelor’s courses.

  • 2019, 2020: Macroeconomic analysis (University of Southern Denmark)
  • 2019: Methods in dynamic economics (University of Southern Denmark)
  • 2008: Principles of microeconomics (Monash University)

Professional experience (policy)

After completing my bachelor’s studies, I worked for ten years in different levels of government in Australia. I started on long-form policy research at the Australian Government’s Productivity Commission, before moving to roles in the Victorian state government where much of my focus was on handling day-to-day policy issues and priorities.

My experience in government has taught me that good analysis counts for little if no one can understand it. I was well regarded for my ability to take complex ideas and express them in easy-to-understand terms for a non-technical audience.